Wondering about wild grapes

Thursday, July 9, 2015

A Bad Spider.

There it was, between my wife and my male dog.  Between the two of them it didn't stand a chance.  My wife administered the coup de grace and I was elected to act as the funeral director.  It was my job to pick up the dead body, transport it to a the funeral home for showing (the porch banister) and then later on to be disposed of.  

They were a brave pair, my wife and dog.  That was a bad, bad spider.  It was bad because it was in my wife's kitchen and it was bad because it was quite poisonous.  It was a brown recluse, I think.  Here is a picture of what one should look like when alive:





This next picture came off the internet and I think it resembles the picture above.  See the stripe on their heads?  This is not a brown recluse, but rather, it is a wolf spider:

The following pictures are three more shots I took holding it at different angles.  Sorry, but the last two are out of focus.
 

I am not sure what kind of spider this was.  If anyone can tell me, I would appreciate it.  I would really like to know if it is or isn't wolf spider

There are a few spiders who's bites can be real dangerous.  Here are the top four most poisonous spiders in North America.
    1.   -   Recluse Spiders (like the Brown Recluse)
    2.   -   Widows  (Like the Black Widow)
    3.   -   Hobo Spiders  (They are mostly found on the west coast.)
    4    -   Yellow Sac Spiders, Black-footed Spider  (They are like the Brown Recluse Spiders in that they prefer to live your homes.)

I would say that most spider bites happen in the home.  A lot of spiders like to hide in your bed, but they can be found anywhere at most anytime.  So be careful not to get bit and have a great day, you hear?



14 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I always do, Barney, I always do. But I guess where you find one spider you find its cousins around somewhere not very far away.

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  2. I've never worried about spiders in the house, but maybe I've just figured the poisonous ones such as the widows hang around the wood pile!

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    1. I don't know how they do it, but they manage to come in somehow. Maybe there is a little space around the water pipes and the sewer drain.

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  3. While we don't get poisonous spiders around here, we do get wolf spiders as large as the palm of my hand -my big big hand. Broke a broom on one once, and it ran away.

    We have a simple rule -outside they are fine, inside they die.

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    Replies
    1. I would keep a spider that size outside where it could scare intruders away.

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  4. I don't have my field guides here in the maintenance shop, so I'm not any help in IDing it. We had brown recluse where we lived in Tennessee, but hardly ever saw one. Most spiders are "good guys", but those nasty ones give all the others a bad name.

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    1. I don't think that it was a bad one, but my wife treats all spiders the same, she kills them.

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  5. Any spider that has the courage to enter my house very quickly finds his/her demise. After living in AZ for six years my hubby has a real fear of spiders ( he came in close contact with Black Widow spiders in his job ). So I am called upon to whack the daylights out of any spider. Have a great weekend.

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    1. We also have those little white scorpions that are really bad. And just this morning, I saw one of those "kissing" beetles that mess you up while you are sleeping. It was outside, so I left it alone.

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  6. Looks like a Wolf to me, Dizzy. Maybe not a deadly bite, but sure can hurt! Saw plenty of those kind in Australia, but only knew 1 person who got bit ...

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    1. I haven't found any with a stripe on its back like this one did, except for the recluse. But I do think that it is a Wolf Spider, as you say.

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  7. I don't play nice with spiders for the most part. We agree to stay away from each other!

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