Wondering about wild grapes

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Wondering About the Age of Rulers.

I got wondering about the ages of rulers throughout history; you know, like who was the youngest and who was the oldest.  So, let's start with England.  The youngest was Mary, Queen of Scots.  She became queen at the at the age of six days old in 1542.  Now that is starting them young, for sure!!

OK, but what about the boys?  Well, the youngest King was Henry VI, who was 8 months and 25 days old.  I guess it takes us boys a little longer to mature than the gals (grin).

Elsewhere in the world, there were also some young rulers.  I would say that the very youngest sworn in as ruler had to be Shah Shapur II back in the year 309.  Persian nobles, according to the legend, placed a crown upon the belly of King Hormizd II's widow.  She was carrying a baby and the fetus was crowned King!!  Now, I want to know how they knew it was a boy???  There were other's who were crowned the day they were born, but I believe no others were crowned before birth.


OK, I sure hope my royal loyal readers enjoyed this blog.  But you know you are royal in my eyes.  Now, have a beautiful and royal day, you all hear?

16 comments:

  1. When I read the title I thought you were going to talk about the age of today's rulers!

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    1. Today's all act like young, spoiled kids. . .

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  2. Very interesting subject, To me the whole idea of having a ruler who gets the title only by the accident of his or her birth is ridiculous and wrong. I can't believe there are still civilized countries in the world where this has been continued, and thank God our revolutionaries and founding fathers chose a different way. Now crowning a king before he was even born - that's wild!

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    1. I guess there is a such a thing as blue bloods, but I would have to cut one of them so I could find out for myself. . .

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  3. Boy was I off base... I read the title and wondered who even uses rulers anymore? I use a tape measure... Bill uses a pull-out/retract one on his belt... and I think we have a yard-stick somewhere, but it's probably ancient. Oh... you meant RULERS!

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    1. They both have been made obsolete by more modern methods, but I still use rulers to measure and draw straight lines.

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    2. Personally I doubt if their blood is any different from ours, except ours is probably better because we aren't so inbred!

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    3. Yep, I agree, except for me, I think mine is green or yellow or orange or . . ..

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    4. That's what I was thinking too. Foot long rulers. I have one that I still use for different things from time to time. As well as tape measures. :)

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  4. That's interesting, but obviously the child is King or Queen in name only until they are a certain age. At least I HOPE so. Someone else would need to be in charge until then. Right? But the fetus in the womb of the dead woman - how in the world would they handle that I wonder.

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    1. In my post the women wasn't dead, the king was And they placed the crown on the mother's belly.

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  5. I think Gypsy and I must have been related in a past life because we have so many things in common. Ditto what she said!

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    1. Me, too regarding Gypsy, MsBelinda. Maybe we are all related. And I thought of the stick kind of measuring rulers. Pulled one out of my kitchen drawer just the other day - I still use it for measuring pie crust or bread dough when I need it to be a little more precise than just an eyeball. Mine still has the metal edge on both sides - never find one like that today. Too dangerous for people to figure out for themselves how to use it; better let the PTB give you something safer.....

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    2. MsB, I agree with you and Gypsy.
      BabySis, I like those old rulers that have the metal edge. I hadn't thought about it, but now that you mentioned it, I don't remember seeing any of them for sell for some time. I will have to make a point of looking closer the next time I am out shopping.

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  6. Somewhere along the line I read of a connection between the "elite' and their use of silver items - cups, goblets, tableware etc. Colloidal silver, a universal antibiotic, when taken in excess can cause the skin to turn blue. Thus, they were called "blue bloods".

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    1. That is interesting and could be quite true. Colloidal silver is good to have around in case you get exposed to toxic stuff including radiation.

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