Wondering about wild grapes

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

And you thought you were old

As of the beginning of this month, there are still five people living who where alive in the 1800's and I am sure you have probably guessed, they are all women.  Now we all know that women live longer than men but these five women are sure pushing the limits.  I bet these ladies would have a lot of stories to tell and believe me, I would sit and listen intently to them.  Would you like to meet them?  I sure would, but since we all can't do that, I will do the next best thing.  I will post their pictures.

How about I start with the youngest one.  This young lady, Emma Morano, is only 115 years old:

Susannah Mushatt Jones is a few months older than Emma.

Jaralean Talley is also 115 but a little older than the two above.

This next picture is the America's oldest living person.  She was born on the 4th of July, 1898.  Yep, she is 116 years old.

Now, this next one is last and by far, not the least.  She is the oldest coming in also at 116 but was born on March 5th, 1898 which makes her the oldest.  Her name is Misao Okawa.

Ain't she beautiful!!  Love that smile.  Heck, and I thought Billy Bob and me were old.  We got a ways to go. . . I hope.  Now  live long and healthy and have a great day, you hear? 

18 comments:

  1. Ms Okawa was born before the Spanish-American war! That is something I did not expect to hear today... thanks!

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    1. Glad I could come up with something unexpected.

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  2. They are all beautiful! Can you imagine the combined knowledge, wisdom and experiences of these wisdom? I wonder what they would consider the most important t hing they've learned in life, the worst experiences they've had, what kind of advice would they give to the young people of the world, and so on. Someone should interview them and write a book! I'm too old or I'd do it myself :-)

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    1. It would be interesting to talk to them. But, how many young people ask you to sit down and ask your opinion on things and what all you have to say about everything you have seen and done in life?

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  3. There ain't no way I would ever want to live long enough to see my kids die of old age. Just the thought of los'n one now makes me cringe.
    My grandpa lived to 93 an' fortunately, did didn't experience the death of one of his kids.

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    1. I only had two kids, both boys. My oldest son got killed in a traffic accident when his son, my only grandson, was eight years old. I never expected to attend my own son's funeral.

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    2. So sorry to hear that, DD.

      My granddaughter was killed by a drunk driver. Heartbreaking!

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  4. My dad was born January 22, 1898 (but died when he was 85).... I wish I'd asked him more about his family, his childhood... everything. He sure lived through a lot of change!

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    1. My Grandpa was born in 1880 and passed away on June 5th, 1968. He retired as an engineer on a steam locomotive on the PRR. He lived from the horse and buggy days to the space age. I remember talking to him about Sputnik.

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    2. We used to go into our backyard (1957?) and watch Sputnik glide over the sky at night. Daddy worked in the coal mines (among many other "careers") but like your Grandpa, lived from Horseless Carriages to Corvettes! (not that he had one)... but telephones, televisions, medical innovations like x-rays, C-T scans .... And sometimes, Dizzy, I think how many changes I've seen, being born in 1941. Our old radio was a huge wooden floor model... about 4" high X 2' wide... and our whole family gathered around it to listen what was happening in WWII. I remember trying to get behind it to find the people who were talking ;-)

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    3. Yep, I still have our old floor model radio out in my shed. When I was a kid I sat in a rocking chair in front of it listening to music.

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  5. My dad was born in 1889, died in a car accident 1964. A drunk hit us, killed both parents. My half brother lived to 96. His mother, my dad's first wife lived to a 100 or so.

    My dad invented the bushhog, he got a patent and everything. I remember riding around all over south Alabama with him trying make a deal to build it. Finally sold the rights for $5000, quite a bit in the fifties.

    I think he would have made it to his nineties if allowed.

    I remember listening to the Lone Ranger on a Grunow radio dad had rebuilt. Lots of other memories.

    Wade in NW Florida

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    1. I have spent a lot of hours pulling a brushhog behind my tractor. Without one, I could have never kept this place from getting overgrown, a sickle bar just doesn't work on the real rough stuff. Thanks to your Dad for inventing the brushhog.

      Does anyone remember the Straight Arrow radio show back then?

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  6. Dizzy - Hermit's and my Grandma was born in 1884, died in 1972, and used to tell us about traveling in a covered wagon. She lived to see a man walk on the moon, and was delighted to see it. That was our daddy's mom, and she buried our dad, her son. Now, the women in Mama's family live well into their 90s, almost all of them. When our Mama turns 90 this November, we're gonna have a bang-up big-time party, and you and all the blogging friends are invited.Mark in on your calendars!

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    1. Congrats to your Mama and hope she keeps going and stays in good health. My Mom made it to 93 but my Dad passed at 60, I will be 72 on Saturday.

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  7. I too, love listening to our senior's stories, and wish I had recorded my x father in law's.

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    1. It is really sad that so much family history and great stories die with our elders.

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