Wondering about wild grapes

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Double Holiday for Me.

Yesterday was Valentine's Day, but it was also my birthday.  I don't really celebrate either of them any more.  I have lived through 75 Valentine's Days and 75 birthdays.  You know, I never thought I would make it this far.  Actually, if you count the first day I was on earth, it has been 76 Valentine's days, right?

I sure do hope you all had a great holiday and was lucky enough, like me, to share it with someone I love.  Now, you all have a great evening, you hear?

14 comments:

  1. Well...Happy Valentines/Birthday Dizzy!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Happy Birthday Dizzy. Can't think of a better way to spend a birthday and Valentine's Day than with someone you love.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Happy belated Birthday Dizzy, mine is tomorrow yikes I remember when I thought even 60 was older than dirt now I have passed that by 11 yrs lol


    ReplyDelete
  4. Hey Dizzy-Dick,

    I finally arrived and duly note that it was your birthday on Valentine's Day.

    Thus, a happy belated birthday wish to you, good sir.

    Gary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Gary. I am beginning to realize what my Mother used to say that "growing old ain't for sissies."

      Delete
  5. I'm happy for you that you had a great birthday/Valentine's day. I'd call us "late middle age", wouldn't you?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep and heading into a second childhood (grin).

      Delete
  6. Happy belated birthday - very interesting blogs. Perhaps you’ve already visited the ghost town of Ruby. It’s located south-east of Tucson; adjacent to Mexico’s border (a small section is annexed into Mexico). Ruby covers a vast area. There’s such a diverse variety of plant and animal life that ASU sponsors tours and conducts related research there.

    If you ever get out Arizona way, Ruby should be right up your alley. It’s set up to accommodate campers - even has a rather large well-stocked lake. It’s a fascinating place to visit; I’ve been there at least three time over the years.

    I believe Ruby was actively mined (silver, and semi-valuable metals) until the late 1930’s. Upon being totally deserted after a few decades, hippies took over the place in the early 1960’s (there’s even a small hippie cemetery).

    Several years later, it was privately purchased and is under continuous restoration. Everything’s there since it was also an active town site; school (with adjacent sliding board), bank, storage vaults, general stores, etc.

    During my second visit I met the owner’s daughter, along with a relative who hangs out there on occasion; having taken over one of the better-preserved adobe cabins. If you do visit Ruby, be sure to check tour availability (there’s a small fee requested). On my first visit I was informed that reservations were required, but I couldn’t confirm that - so I took a chance by going there unannounced. There was a closed gate and, as I recall, a push button buzzer that opened the gate.

    Another neat ghost town is Vulture city (site of the Vulture mine - one of the most productive gold mining sites in Arizona), and is privately owned. Most of the gold still remains - the mines shut down after flooding caused by earthquakes (down to the 700 foot level) in northern Mexico. When last there, the owner informed me that the place was for sale, and 7 or 8 large mining conglomerates had bids in place for resumption of mining.

    I’m big into western history, and as such I’ve spent hundreds of hours searching out and photographing ghost towns. As I’m sure you’re aware, they’re fast disappearing due to natural causes but, far worse, by vandalism. In the last few years I’m seeing more and more spray-painted gang symbols - so, I’ve taken to carrying my trusty Colt .45 revolver along.

    You mention visiting Stanton, which is privately owned by a hobbyist prospectors club (of which you are apparently a member). It has been well preserved, and is constantly under restoration. I’ve been there at least 3 times over the years; the place is historically quite interesting - definitely an authentic “wild west” artifact.

    In the same general vicinity is the Congress mine. Several years ago my eldest son and I were there and, as usual, I was photographing everything in sight. A few months later I was visiting friends (Tom and Marge Elliott) who own the Western Heritage Museum in Tombstone. I mentioned our trip to the Congress mine, and Tom retrieved an old photo of the Congress mine; asking me if I noticed anything different on the photo.

    I replied that it was especially interesting in that it was taken from the same vantage point as one of the photos I had recently taken, and was obviously a very old and somewhat faded black and white photo. He then mentioned that I should take a look at the reverse side of the photo. It was signed “Wyatt S. Earp” with the date noted (which I have since forgotten). So, apparently old Wyatt was also a photography buff!

    Have a pleasant weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. It has been awhile since I was at Stanton. In fact, my diesel pusher has not been run for way over a year.

      Delete
  7. Know what you mean by not really celebrating both of them anymore so if your not celebrating I had better not wish you a celebratory congrats. But in case you had a twinkle, here's a twankle.....Happy Birthday and it looks like ya got 3 years on me too.......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope I can keep that three year gap for awhile.

      Delete